25.4.11

Abortion stories.

http://mypage.direct.ca/w/writer/anti-tales.html

I have no problems with people having abortions. Up to a point. Where that point is should be decided by the individual community/state/country. I also have no problems with individual states outlawing abortion in that state. If you don't like it, no-one's forcing you to get pregnant.

Oops. Maybe someone did. Yeah, rape, incest, mother's life is in danger and stuff like that - you really need an option to not carry that baby to term. You really need a hospital somewhere in a state that can conduct these procedures in order to save the mother's life, or give victims of rape and incest the option to not have to deal with pregnancy and the kid.

Either case, the link above goes to anecdotal stories (no names) of anti-abortion activists who decide that their case is somehow special.

Sample:

"In 1990, in the Boston area, Operation Rescue and other groups were regularly blockading the clinics, and many of us went every Saturday morning for months to help women and staff get in. As a result, we knew many of the 'antis' by face. One morning, a woman who had been a regular 'sidewalk counselor' went into the clinic with a young woman who looked like she was 16-17, and obviously her daughter. When the mother came out about an hour later, I had to go up and ask her if her daughter's situation had caused her to change her mind. 'I don't expect you to understand my daughter's situation!' she angrily replied. The following Saturday, she was back, pleading with women entering the clinic not to 'murder their babies.'" (Clinic escort, Massachusetts)

So are these stories representative or statistically significant? No. Does it speak about human nature and psychology? Yes.

Oops. Maybe it is statistically significant.


"We have anti-choice women in for abortions all the time. Many of them are just naive and ignorant until they find themselves with an unwanted pregnancy. Many of them are not malicious. They just haven't given it the proper amount of thought until it completely affects them. They can be judgmental about their friends, family, and other women. Then suddenly they become pregnant. Suddenly they see the truth. That it should only be their own choice. Unfortunately, many also think that somehow they are different than everyone else and they deserve to have an abortion, while no one else does." (Physician, Washington State)Although few studies have been made of this phenomenon, a study done in 1981 (1) found that 24% of women who had abortions considered the procedure morally wrong, and 7% of women who'd had abortions disagreed with the statement, "Any woman who wants an abortion should be permitted to obtain it legally." A 1994/95 survey (2,3) of nearly 10,000 abortion patients showed 18% of women having abortions are born-again or Evangelical Christians. Many of these women are likely anti-choice. The survey also showed that Catholic women have an abortion rate 29% higher than Protestant women. A Planned Parenthood handbook on abortion notes that nearly half of all abortions are for women who describe themselves as born-again Christian, Evangelical Christian, or Catholic. (4)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rationalization_(making_excuses)

Abortion is murder? Sure, I guess. In which case I have no problems with murdering unborn children before they've developed to that point - the point which should be determined in each individual community. Depends on when you believe human life begins. Or how much you care about it.

A human egg that just got fertilized has no rights whatsoever in my book. If the kid is about to pop out in a day or two - then yes, hell yes that kid has rights. In between there you can argue til you're blue in the face. I suggest you make it a local matter and leave the people be who don't share your opinion in different parts of the world or the united STATES. State's rights. Individual communities running their own business as long as civil rights are protected and taxes get paid and you're not letting criminals buy guns too easily.

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